The Munro Letters 1914 - 1917 : Letters Home from the Front - World War I
Date of Letter:
1916/05/17
Summary:
In which G. B. Chisholm advises Melville Munro that he is in the hospital with a slight case of blood poisoning. Includes mention of: the 76th and 164th Battalion; G. B. Chisholm's hope to see his brother, Jim; the diversity of the men among the ranks; and, fellow soldiers Harvey Lightbourne and Kenneth Marshall.
Transcription:
Flanders
May 17th/16

Dear Pork,

As perhaps you have heard, I am in hospital. "└ Present je suis dans la salle-Ó-manger de l'h˘pital" and a guy is playing the "The Perfect Day" on the violin, accompanied by the piano. Nearly gives me the weeps! Now he's making it worse with the "Humoresque"(?) Believe me I'm most deliciously homesick. 'Nuff about me just now.

Well Pork, how's the army getting along, as personified in the 164th Battn? I hear a little about you - all occasionally but not very often. Don't even know whether the 76th is in England yet or not. Here's hoping I get my leave while Jim is there. Being my brother, I suppose it will be alright to be seen with an officer but as they say out here; - "The officers are fine men and alright out here but after the war, don't you know, one would hardly care to associate with them!" There speaks our democratic army! You meet preachers, millionaires, lords and things in the most unexpected places. They have a Sgt. in P.P.'s who is the despair of his platoon - he refuses to get mad and swear when such a "contre de temps" as lost working parties, late rations etc happen. They have almost given up hopes of curing him, I hear, and are beginning to accept him in a spirit of resignation. There are certainly some fine men in the ranks though. The P.P.C.L.I's didn't know for a long time that their Sgt. was a minister. There's a man sitting at the other side of the table I'm writing on with vivid red hair who was in Harvey Lightbourne's platoon in the 4th C.M.R. and knows Kenneth Marshall. Both of whom, by the way are Capt's now. Kenneth is Quartermaster he tells me (not Kenneth, the red haired guy across from me. The man at the piano has just sung the "Rosary" & is now on "Mother Macree", - he sure has a bug-eyed audience About 99.99% of them are thinking about home. Tomorrow, I'm going to take all my nerve and write to the O.H.S. to thank them for the book they sent. It sure is great. Gug has them both. We were camped under great shady elms in a most beautiful green field and having a fine time but one day about 4.30 PM the Sgt. came to me and said that ten of us had till 7.P.M. to pack up and hike about four miles with our packs and everything we owned for five days instruction on the Lewis Machine Gun. The second day I developed a mild case of blood poisoning and was sent "down", not very far down but about ten miles from the nearest part of the front trench Not bad for a few days. I don't think I will miss a trip to the trenches. I hope not, as if I do someone will have to go in my place.

Well Pork I to light have to quit.

Lots of luck old man. Best to the family & the bunch.

Votre ami vrai,

Brock.
Object ID:
2017.22.91
Click to Enlarge
Gordon Munro Letters, May 17, 1916Gordon Munro Letters, May 17, 1916
Gordon Munro Letters, May 17, 1916Gordon Munro Letters, May 17, 1916
Gordon Munro Letters, May 17, 1916Gordon Munro Letters, May 17, 1916
Gordon Munro Letters, May 17, 1916Gordon Munro Letters, May 17, 1916
Gordon Munro Letters, May 17, 1916Gordon Munro Letters, May 17, 1916
Gordon Munro Letters, May 17, 1916Gordon Munro Letters, May 17, 1916
Gordon Munro Letters, May 17, 1916Gordon Munro Letters, May 17, 1916
Gordon Munro Letters, May 17, 1916Gordon Munro Letters, May 17, 1916